Monday, 30 November 2015

End of DADA WEEK


After a week of daily publishing sound works online, I'd like to thank you all for viewing, listening, likes, retweets, hearts, commments and e-mails.

Listen to all the Dada Manifesto soundpieces at my Soundcloud page:
https://soundcloud.com/cbjordheim/sets/dada-manifesto 



Sunday, 29 November 2015

DADA WEEK/SUNDAY: Dada Excites Everything by Tristan Tzara and others (1921)

"DADA EXCITES EVERYTHING

DADA knows everything. DADA spits everything out.
                       BUT.........
HAS DADA EVER SPOKEN TO YOU:

about Italy
about accordions
about women's pants
about the fatherland
about sardines
about Fiume
about Art (you exaggerate my friend)
about gentleness
about D'Annunzio
what a horror
about heroism
about moustaches
about lewdness
about sleeping with Verlaine
about the ideal (it's nice)
about Massachusetts
about the past
about odours
about salads
about genius, about genius, about genius
abouth the eight-hour day
about the Parma violets

NEVER           NEVER        NEVER 

DADA doesn't speak. DADA has no fixed idea. DADA doesn't catch flies."





--
November 23rd – 29th I'll publish 7 recent sound works based on dada manifestos from 1916 to 1921, played by a music box. The manifesto, the text, on one or several A4-pages, is cut into one long strip to fit a music box and then spliced with tape. Some manifestos has been scanned from top to bottom (vertically) and others from left to right (horizontally). The letters D and A in the text are then punctuated, so the absence of D and A (..DADA), is what you hear being played.

The first dada manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) encourages poets to stop writing with words, but rather write the word itself, and Ball states that:
"I shall be reading poems that are meant to dispense with conventional language, no less, and to have done with it"
In this way this collection of Dada Manifestos acts in accordance with Ball's manifesto, using the word construct as the direct source.

Check out the composition from the very first Dada Manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) here.

--
EARLIER THIS WEEK:

Nov. 23rd:
Dada Manifesto by Tristan Tzara (1918)

Nov. 24th:  
First German Dada Manifesto by Richard Huelsenbeck (1918)

Nov. 25th:  
What is Dadaism and what does it want in Germany? 
 by Richard Huelsenbeck and Raoul Hausmann (1919)

Nov 26th:  
Dada Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

Nov. 27th:  
Dada Cannibalistic Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

Nov 28th:
Twenty-three Manifestos of the Dada Movement by Tristan Tzara and others (1920)

--

AND:
The Whole Dada Manifesto (1918-1921) Playlist here.

Saturday, 28 November 2015

DADA WEEK/SATURDAY: Twenty-three Manifestos of the Dada Movement by Tristan Tzara and others (1920)

"No more painters, no more writers, no more musicians, no more sculptors, no more religions, no more republicans, no more royalists, no more imperialists, no more anarchists, no more socialists, no more Bolsheviks, no more politicians, no more proletarians, no more democrats, no more bourgeois, no more aristocrats, no more armies, no more police, no more fatherlands, enough of all these imbeciles, no more anything, no more anything, nothing, nothing, nothing, nothing.
We hope something new will come from this, being exactly what we no longer want, determinedly less putrid, less selfish, less materialistic, less obtuse, less immensely grotesque.
Long live concubines and the con-cubists. All members of the DADA movement are presidents."
 ---
Dada Parasol
 So you don't like my manifesto?
You've come here bursting with hostility and you're going to start
whistling at me before you've even heard me out?
Great! Carry on, the wheels turns as it's turned since Adam, nothing
changes, except now we've only got two legs instead of four.
But you're really making me laught and I wish to repay you for your
lovely welcome by talking to you about Aart, poetry, etc. Etc. Hippicackuanna.
Have you ever seen a telegraph pole having a tough time trying to
grow beside roads between nettles and blown tyres?
But as soon as it's grown a bit taller than its neighbours it grows so
fast that you can never stop it . . . never!
Then it opens out right up there in the sky, lights up, swells out, is a
parasol, a taxi, an encyclopedia or a toothpick.
So you are happy now? OK . . . that's it . . . that's all I wanted to say
to you. That's poetreee for you . . . honest!
Poetry = toothpick, encyclopedia, taxi or parasol-shade, and if you're
not satisfied . . . 
TO THE TOWER WITH YOU

CÉLINE ARNAULD



--
November 23rd – 29th I'll publish 7 recent sound works based on dada manifestos from 1916 to 1921, played by a music box. The manifesto, the text, on one or several A4-pages, is cut into one long strip to fit a music box and then spliced with tape. Some manifestos has been scanned from top to bottom (vertically) and others from left to right (horizontally). The letters D and A in the text are then punctuated, so the absence of D and A (..DADA), is what you hear being played.

The first dada manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) encourages poets to stop writing with words, but rather write the word itself, and Ball states that:
"I shall be reading poems that are meant to dispense with conventional language, no less, and to have done with it"
In this way this collection of Dada Manifestos acts in accordance with Ball's manifesto, using the word construct as the direct source.

 Check out the composition from the very first Dada Manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) here.

--
UPCOMING:

Nov. 29th:  
Dada Excites Everything by Tristan Tzara and others (1921)

EARLIER THIS WEEK:

Nov. 23rd:
Dada Manifesto by Tristan Tzara (1918)

Nov. 24th:  
First German Dada Manifesto by Richard Huelsenbeck (1918)

Nov. 25th:  
What is Dadaism and what does it want in Germany? 
 by Richard Huelsenbeck and Raoul Hausmann (1919)

Nov 26th:  
Dada Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

Nov. 27th:  
Dada Cannibalistic Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

Friday, 27 November 2015

DADA WEEK/FRIDAY: Dada Cannibalistic Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)


"You are all accused; stand up. The orator will speak to you only if you
are standing.
Standing as for the Marseillaise,
standing as for the Russian hymn,
standing as for God save the king,
standing as before the flag.
Finally standing before DADA, which represents life and accuses you of
loving
everything out of snobbism from the moment that it becomes
expensive."




--
November 23rd – 29th I'll publish 7 recent sound works based on dada manifestos from 1916 to 1921, played by a music box. The manifesto, the text, on one or several A4-pages, is cut into one long strip to fit a music box and then spliced with tape. Some manifestos has been scanned from top to bottom (vertically) and others from left to right (horizontally). The letters D and A in the text are then punctuated, so the absence of D and A (..DADA), is what you hear being played.

The first dada manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) encourages poets to stop writing with words, but rather write the word itself, and Ball states that:
"I shall be reading poems that are meant to dispense with conventional language, no less, and to have done with it"
In this way this collection of Dada Manifestos acts in accordance with Ball's manifesto, using the word construct as the direct source.

Check out the composition from the very first Dada Manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) here.

--
UPCOMING:

Nov 28th:
Twenty-three Manifestos of the Dada Movement by Tristan Tzara and others (1920)

Nov. 29th:  
Dada Excites Everything by Tristan Tzara and others (1921)

EARLIER THIS WEEK:

Nov. 23rd:
Dada Manifesto by Tristan Tzara (1918)

Nov. 24th:  
First German Dada Manifesto by Richard Huelsenbeck (1918)

Nov. 25th:  
What is Dadaism and what does it want in Germany? 
 by Richard Huelsenbeck and Raoul Hausmann (1919)

Nov 26th:  
Dada Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

Thursday, 26 November 2015

DADA WEEK/THURSDAY: Dada Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

"Comedy, comedy, comedy, comedy, comedy, my dear friends.
Dealers don't like art, they know the mystery of the spirit...
Buy reproductions of signed works.
Don't be a snob, you are no less intelligent because your neighbour has the same as you
(..)
As for Dada, it means nothing, nothing, nothing. It makes the public say
'We understand nothing, nothing, nothing.'
The Dadaists are nothing, nothing, nothing and they will certainly succed in nothing, nothing, nothing."




--
November 23rd – 29th I'll publish 7 recent sound works based on dada manifestos from 1916 to 1921, played by a music box. The manifesto, the text, on one or several A4-pages, is cut into one long strip to fit a music box and then spliced with tape. Some manifestos has been scanned from top to bottom (vertically) and others from left to right (horizontally). The letters D and A in the text are then punctuated, so the absence of D and A (..DADA), is what you hear being played.

The first dada manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) encourages poets to stop writing with words, but rather write the word itself, and Ball states that:
"I shall be reading poems that are meant to dispense with conventional language, no less, and to have done with it"
In this way this collection of Dada Manifestos acts in accordance with Ball's manifesto, using the word construct as the direct source.

Check out the composition from the very first Dada Manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) here.
--

UPCOMING:

Nov. 27th:  
Dada Canibalistic Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

Nov 28th:
Twenty-three Manifestos of the Dada Movement by Tristan Tzara and others (1920)

Nov. 29th:  
Dada Excites Everything by Tristan Tzara and others (1921)

EARLIER THIS WEEK:

Nov. 23rd:
Dada Manifesto by Tristan Tzara (1918)

Nov. 24th:  
First German Dada Manifesto by Richard Huelsenbeck (1918)

Nov. 25th:  
What is Dadaism and what does it want in Germany? 
 by Richard Huelsenbeck and Raoul Hausmann (1919)

Wednesday, 25 November 2015

DADA WEEK/WEDNESDAY: What is Dadaism and what does it want in Germany? by Richard Huelsenbeck and Raoul Hausmann (1919)

"The Central Council demands:
a) Daily meals at public expense for all creative and intellectual men and women on the
Potsdamer Platz (Berlin)"




--
November 23rd – 29th I'll publish 7 recent sound works based on dada manifestos from 1916 to 1921, played by a music box. The manifesto, the text, on one or several A4-pages, is cut into one long strip to fit a music box and then spliced with tape. Some manifestos has been scanned from top to bottom (vertically) and others from left to right (horizontally). The letters D and A in the text are then punctuated, so the absence of D and A (..DADA), is what you hear being played.

The first dada manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) encourages poets to stop writing with words, but rather write the word itself, and Ball states that:
"I shall be reading poems that are meant to dispense with conventional language, no less, and to have done with it"
In this way this collection of Dada Manifestos acts in accordance with Ball's manifesto, using the word construct as the direct source.

Check out the composition from the very first Dada Manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) here.

---
UPCOMING:

Nov 26th:  
Dada Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

Nov. 27th:  
Dada Canibalistic Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

Nov 28th:
Twenty-three Manifestos of the Dada Movement by Tristan Tzara and others (1920)

Nov. 29th:  
Dada Excites Everything by Tristan Tzara and others (1921)

EARLIER THIS WEEK:

Nov. 23rd:
Dada Manifesto by Tristan Tzara (1918)

Nov. 24th:  
First German Dada Manifesto by Richard Huelsenbeck (1918)

Tuesday, 24 November 2015

DADA WEEK/TUESDAY: First German Dada Manifesto by Richard Huelsenbeck (1918)



"The word Dada instantly signals the internationalism of the movement, which is bound to no frontiers, religions, or professions. Dada is the international expression of the times, the great rebellion of artistic movements, the artistic reflex of all these offensives, peace congresses, riots in the vegetable market, suppers at the Esplanade, etc., etc
(..)
Down with the aesthetic-ethical attitudes! Down with the bloodless abstraction of expressionism! Down with the world-bettering theories of empty-headed literati. Up with Dadaism in word and image, with all the Dada things that happen in the world! To be against this manifesto is to be a Dadaist!"
 


The Manifesto in text.
--
November 23rd – 29th I'll publish 7 recent sound works based on dada manifestos from 1916 to 1921, played by a music box. The manifesto, the text, on one or several A4-pages, is cut into one long strip to fit a music box and then spliced with tape. Some manifestos has been scanned from top to bottom (vertically) and others from left to right (horizontally). The letters D and A in the text are then punctuated, so the absence of D and A (..DADA), is what you hear being played.

The first dada manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) encourages poets to stop writing with words, but rather write the word itself, and Ball states that:
"I shall be reading poems that are meant to dispense with conventional language, no less, and to have done with it"
In this way this collection of Dada Manifestos acts in accordance with Ball's manifesto, using the word construct as the direct source.

Check out the composition from the very first Dada Manifesto by Hugo Ball (1916) here.

UPCOMING:

Nov. 25th:  
What is Dadaism and what does it want in Germany? 
 by Richard Huelsenbeck and Raoul Hausmann (1919)

Nov 26th:  
Dada Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

Nov. 27th:  
Dada Canibalistic Manifesto by Francis Picabia (1920)

Nov 28th:
Twenty-three Manifestos of the Dada Movement by Tristan Tzara and others (1920)

Nov. 29th:  
Dada Excites Everything by Tristan Tzara and others (1921)

EARLIER THIS WEEK:

Nov. 23rd:
Dada Manifesto by Tristan Tzara (1918)